Surrounds

6 comments on “Dipole vs Bipole Speakers: What’s the Difference?

  1. haley

    Are you getting bipole and dipole mixed up in

    “You get the simplest bipole speaker by mounting a driver onto an open baffle”
    and
    “In a dipole configuration, the central area of the speaker gets a diffuse sound caused by the off-axis summed response of the two in-phase drivers”

  2. Fernando Sierra - PR

    What about combining Dipole and Bipole Speakers on a 7.1 System…..? Lets say Dipoles on the Sides and Bipole on Back? Is that a good combination or they all should be the same? I hear a lot of 2-ch Stereo music mostly on a 2.1 setup, but like to watch Concerts on a 7.1 setup.

  3. Mike

    I really like Clint’s common sense approach to this home theatre stuff. There is an awful lot of overpriced nonsense out there, but for good advice I end up here.

  4. George Meier

    In the sentence “In a dipole configuration, the central area of the speaker gets a diffuse sound caused by the off-axis summed response of the two in-phase drivers” shouldn’t it say “In a bipole configuration, …?

  5. Mike Curnutt

    “How to Remember the Difference Between Dipole vs Bipole Speakers: With a bipole speaker “b”oth driver pairs are firing in-phase with each other. With a dipole speaker, the drivers are firing in “d”ifferent phase from each other. Dipole speakers are more “d”iffuse because they create a null at the listening position. If that doesn’t help you remember, nothing will!”

    In a dipole configuration, because the two drivers are 180° out of phase with each other, the two opposites cancel each other in the center of the listening area. That’s why the diffuse effect is more dramatic.

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